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Exploring MDMA-Assisted psychotherapy

MDMA is a synthetic drug short for 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine, and is chemically similar to both stimulants and psychedelics, the latter of which it is often grouped together with despite not being a 'classic psychedelic'.

MDMA’s ability to help people gain access to their emotions made it a popular drug to treat depression in the late 1970s, as well as in couples therapy to foster closeness. The psychologist and psychotherapist who first brought MDMA to the world of psychotherapy, Leo Zeff, reportedly called the drug “penicillin for the soul.”

MDMA-assisted therapy is an experimental treatment that combines psychotherapeutic techniques with administration of MDMA under direct observation as a pharmacological adjunct that enhances therapy. In the early 2000s the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) launched the first clinical study into MDMA’s therapeutic potential, specifically for PTSD. In one study, 68% of the 107 participants involved no longer had PTSD one year after treatment.

Increased feelings of interpersonal closeness, changes in social perception, and reduced anxiety might make MDMA a suitable pharmacological adjunct to enhance therapy for treatment of anxiety disorders, such as PTSD, social anxiety, and anxiety associated with other conditions.

If you're curious about exploring psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy and whether it's a right choice for you, don't hesitate to reach out to our team or book a consultation online.

Sources: Third Wave, MAPS, Doubleblind

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By Lauren Young
May 06, 2022